Tijdschrift voor de geschiedenis van de kartografie in Nederland
Journal for the history of cartography in the Netherlands

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Inhoud 14e jaargang (1995)
Contents of volume 14 (1995)

no. 1     no. 2     no. 3     no. 4

Caert-Thresoor 14e jaargang 1995, nr. 1

Caert-Thresoor 14e jaargang 1995, nr. 2

Caert-Thresoor 14e jaargang 1995, nr. 3

Caert-Thresoor 14e jaargang 1995, nr. 4


Summaries

Wim Ligtendag
The use of old maps for historians on geography: the practices during a period of research

[Caert-Tresoor 14(1995) 1, pp. 1-5]

In a study aimed at reconstructing the exact location of the southeastern coastline of the North Sea in the years 1600 AD and 1750 AD, a considerable number of old maps were analysed. In this article some findings are presented, which were made during the analysis of those maps. It appeared that for a systematic analysis of the contents of old maps, the traditional division of the maps in various sorts, was not very important. The best items to consider as starting points of analysis were the purpose of the mapmaker and the aim with which a map is studied. It also turned out that making a distinction in three sorts of accuracy (topographical, chronometric and geodetic accuracy) often enhances the usefulness of an old map. In order to enlarge the usefulness of old maps in general for historical-geographical research, it is advisable to start a project in which historical-cartographers and historical geographers together aim at the collection of as much information as possible, not only by drawing up a complete inventory of all old maps of the Netherlands, but also by finding and studying the - hitherto largely neglected - relevant written sources in the various archives. The results of these efforts are only optimally useful if they are stored in a centrally managed database. In a study aimed at reconstructing the exact location of the southeastern coastline of the North Sea in the years 1600 AD and 1750 AD, a considerable number of old maps were analysed. In this article some findings are presented, which were made during the analysis of those maps. It appeared that for a systematic analysis of the contents of old maps, the traditional division of the maps in various sorts, was not very important. The best items to consider as starting points of analysis were the purpose of the mapmaker and the aim with which a map is studied. It also turned out that making a distinction in three sorts of accuracy (topographical, chronometric and geodetic accuracy) often enhances the usefulness of an old map. In order to enlarge the usefulness of old maps in general for historical-geographical research, it is advisable to start a project in which historical-cartographers and historical geographers together aim at the collection of as much information as possible, not only by drawing up a complete inventory of all old maps of the Netherlands, but also by finding and studying the - hitherto largely neglected - relevant written sources in the various archives. The results of these efforts are only optimally useful if they are stored in a centrally managed database. (back)

H.A.M. van der Heijden
Atlas Iprensis, 1570-1639

[Caert-Tresoor 14(1995) 2, pp. 25-34]

During the exhibition at Louvain 'Eenheid op Papier', October-December 1994, people were given the opportunity to have the maps in their possession judged and estimated. On this occasion a composite atlas was presented, composed by a canon of Ieper around 1640, comprising 68 of the rarest and most beautiful Dutch maps from the period 1570-1639. Inasmuch as this important collection will not be accessible to the public, it has been described in full detail. In order to facilitate quotation the atlas has been named 'Atlas Iprensis'. (back)

Paul Peters
The restauration of two Mercator-globes owned by the Oudheidkundige Kring van het Land van Waas, Sint-Niklaas, Belgium

[Caert-Tresoor 14(1995) 2, pp. 37-43]

In accordance with the Mercator year 1994 a Mercator globe pair, owned by the Koninklijke Oudheidkundige Kring van het Land van Waas in Sint-Niklaas (Belgium) has been restaurated by Restauration Studio Paul Peters in Eerbeek (Netherlands). The celestial and earthglobe were in a very bad condition. Amongst others dirt accumulation, scratches, addition of not original wood during an earlier, badly executed restauration, driven in nails, peeling, holes in the gypsum and paper, etc. had been diagnosed. What's more, both globes had been furnished by a dirty, very darkly looking varnish coating. Under this a layer of an animal glue had been applied. After we had got a clear idea about the damages which had been made in the past centuries, these have been restaurated by several specialists. This article reports how the restaurations were done. (back)

Jeanine Otten
Mapdrawers an mapcolourists mentioned in the diaries of Pieter de Graeff (1638-1707)

[Caert-Tresoor 14(1995) 2, pp. 53-58]

From the Amsterdam merchant and notable Pieter de Graeff (1638-1707) diaries have been preserved. He made several notes on negotiations and payments regarding surveying of his possessions. He encountered some problems with the famous graphical artist Romeyn de Hooghe, who should draw an artistic map of de Graeff's estate Valkenburg. Besides he had some maps coloured by the colourist David Reerigh, who also coloured several maps of the Hoogheemraadschap of Rijnland of 1687. (back)

Peter van der Krogt
The folio map of the Netherlands by Filips Galle (1579)

[Caert-Tresoor 14(1995) 2, pp. 63-67]

During a research visit in the Westminster Abbey Library in London a unique map was found in a composite atlas. It is the folio map of the Seventeen Provinces by Filips Galle of 1579. The existence of this map, next to a multisheet wall map, was supposed by a remark in the accounts of the Plantin press, but a copy was not known yet. Van der Heijden and Schilder assumed that the both maps of the Netherlands published by Vrients in 1605 (wall map) and 1606 (folio map) were later states of the 1579 maps. This hypothesis is now proved to be not true for the folio map. (back)

H.A.M. van der Heijden
The map as art

[Caert-Tresoor 14(1995) 4, pp. 77-84]

Art-history and particularly graphic art have given scant attention to the historical cartography. This applies both to the graphic collections and to studies on the subject. Of late, with regard to this want some improvement is perceptible. Art-historians, however, still occupy themselves mainly with the decorative adornments which the old cartographers have added to their maps. Hardly any attention is paid to the entire map as an object of art. This article pleads for the historical cartography as being a valid display of art and an acknowledged sector of the graphic art in particular. In other words a pleading for the map as an object of fine art. (back)

Fineke te Raa
Maps in the State Archive of the province of Northern Brabant

[Caert-Tresoor 14(1995) 4, pp. 87-92]

The archive was founded in 1860. The map-collection consists for the greatest part of printed maps, many of them on the Netherlands and especially on the surveying of the rivers. The greater part of the maps however are related to parts of the province of Northern Brabant.
There are no wall-maps. The manuscript-maps are mainly military-maps and maps concerning the administration of land. The oldest manuscript-map in the collection dates from 1564. There are only a few manuscript-maps made by the famous provincial surveyor Hendrik Verhees.
The maps of the Public archives mainly date from the nineteenth century. They are located in four departments: the Kadaster (Register of Real Property, Cadaster), Waterstaat (Public works, Rivers), Domeinen (Domain-lands) and the Dienst der Genie (Military Engineering Service). There are some private archives and an important one is that of the surveyor-family of Adan (1740-1875).
The maps in the collections are accessible via a geographically organised photo-catalogue; the Cadaster- and Domain-lands maps via inventories. At the moment an inventory is being made of the map-archives of Waterstaat and the Engineers. Most archive-maps are accessible via microfiches.
Last july a project was launched to reveal all hidden image-documents, present in the archives and to make them accessible via an automated image-catalogue. It is expected that many unknown maps will be discovered in both private and public archives. (back)


© Caert-Thresoor and Peter van der Krogt